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Wooden Mack truck model toy

Wayne
Super Contributor
Wayne
Wayne
Super Contributor

Built with patience and precision, this wooden truck model was created from scratch with detailed work in the chassis and undercarriage.

 

 

Mack Truck 1.jpg

 

The project


I bought the plans for this semi trailer Mack truck model some time ago but never seemed to be able to find the time to make it at home, so it was ideal as my first project at the community shed.


It has been a test of patience and skill and while there are stores where you can buy ready-made wheels and axles and other components, I chose to build everything from scratch.


There is a lot of detailed work which can't be seen with the chassis and undercarriage for both the truck and the trailer. It has been both frustrating and satisfying so far and is a world away from my usual woodworking tasks.

 

More wooden truck projects

 

Workshop member kel shared these beautiful wooden firetrucks built to be given as Christmas presents.

 

StevieB_0-1626093956205.jpeg

 

Comments
woodenwookie
Experienced Contributor

How did you make the wheels?

 

I’d be real keen to find that out.

MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Hi @woodenwookie,

 

Let me mention @Wayne to see if he can enlighten us about creating these wheels. However, there might be some clues in the image that I've found. We can see a 19mm board which I suspect he's used a hole saw on to remove circular cutouts, as seen stacked on the right of the image.

 

The contour of the inner wheel looks suspiciously close to the bit in the router sitting next to the wheel stack. Hence, I'd propose he's routed the inside of the wheel rim.

 

I then note the 4mm drill bit in the bottom right of the photo, which likely has been used to drill the series of holes around the wheel hub. The most accurate way to do this I can think of would be with a drill press and using the axle hole as a pivot point.

 

I'd then use a bolt locked into the rim as an axle and stick the bolt in a drill. You can then run the drill and take some sandpaper to the corners of the tires to round them off.

 

I'd also be interested in knowing how these were actually made. Perhaps @bigrigmodels might also like to chime in on their method.

 

Mitchell

 

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