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My new tool wall

JustJim
Established Contributor

My new tool wall

I'm Jim and I'm new here. Very new. First posting new!          

 

I'm retired and keen to get back into woodworking. I recently bought a house in Warrnambool that has a decent sized shed, so here we go.

 

I've carried quite a few hand tools and a couple of small power tools with me from place to place over my years of Navy service and subsequent private rentals. I've probably lived at 20 addresses in the past 40 years. That's not a situation to be building up a workshop, although much respect to those who do.

 

This series of posts (if that's how this site works, I'm not sure if this would be better as a 'discussion' or a 'gallery' post) will detail the construction and fitting out of the tool wall.

 

It starts with getting some plywood fixed to the timber cross-pieces on one half of the back wall of my shed. This is 19mm plywood, what the Cousins would call 3/4".  I seem to recall, when I was learning this stuff from my late dad, that we would size it simply by the number of layers or laminations. Thus we had (iirc) 9-ply, 5-ply and 3-ply. If 3-ply was 1/4" it makes sense that 9-ply was 3/4". I suppose 1/2" got short-changed to keep an odd number of laminations and so keep the grain on the outer faces in the same direction. 

 

Anyhoo! One thing that has changed is that a full sheet of 9-ply/3/4"/19mm plywood is approximately 37 times as heavy and awkward to handle as it was in the days of my youth. And 137 times as expensive!

 

I have a few webbing ratchet tie-downs so I rigged two of them and, singing a sea shanty to myself, heaved away and/or hauled away.

 

Thus we get to the first photograph.

 

This has become far too long so I shall follow it up in the next few days with progress reports of different tool mounts.

 

Stay safe,

Join your union,

 

JimPlywood tool wall being hoisted. Sorry for potato quality, was stressed!Plywood tool wall being hoisted. Sorry for potato quality, was stressed!

Plywood tool wall in placePlywood tool wall in place                                                                    

Stay safe,
Join your union,

Jim
JustJim
Established Contributor

Re: My new tool wall

Having an assembly table is all well and good but when I gather the equipment I need to put something together, I often forget to grab a few sheets of paper towel for wiping up glue spillage or squeeze-out.

By the time I remember, I usually have glue on one hand or the other and having the roll of paper towel just laying on a shelf or bench doesn't make for simple one-handed operation.

So I built this doohickey and screwed it to my tool wall. It'll have to come off for an oiling next time I mix some up.


Towel roll holder close up.Towel roll holder close up.Towel roll holder showing location on the tool wall.Towel roll holder showing location on the tool wall.

Note the use of a paper feed roller from an old scanner/printer that I salvaged.

 

 

Stay safe,
Join your union,

Jim
JustJim
Established Contributor

Re: My new tool wall

Next up is a way to deal with rolls of tape and balls of string.

This has been way over designed, but I imagine that it won't take long to fill up with different sorts and sizes of tape.

The two tape shelves are angled and are lower at the rear than at the front. This keeps the rolls on the shelf without having to have a lip at the front edge.

I could probably have done without the extra blocks for the string spindles. The dowels go completely through them and halfway into the top shelf. The idea was that the balls of string would sit down over the blocks and they wouldn't be seen. That obviously isn't the case.

Somehow I didn't take a wider shot, but this rack is directly above the plier rack which meant that the paper towel holder had to be taken back down for a while.  I'm considering mounting it under the lip of the assembly table instead. At least the paper towel rack finally got its long-awaited finish of boiled linseed oil cut with mineral turps at the same time as the new rack.

 

Rather than screw this to the tool wall through the thin 3mm plywood of its back, this rack is mouned via a French cleat.

 

 

The tape and string rack. Oiled up and hanging by a French cleat.The tape and string rack. Oiled up and hanging by a French cleat.

Stay safe,
Join your union,

Jim

Re: My new tool wall

I'm an elder newbie and I am glad to have found an au site. This ply panel wall is a great idea I have an aluminium 6X4 shed and lack storage space. its double door is wasted as I only use one side. I will now set up a tool wall on the other fixed door and will enjoy cleaning up my bench on the go. At the moments I fill my workbench up as I am building a project and gradually run out of room. I am working on cupboards for my brothers reno caravan. will post some photos later.
mike1952
New Contributor

Re: My new tool wall

I started to install a tool wall today similar to what you have done, thanks for the idea I'll try to update you on what I am doing 

 

regards

mike

JustJim
Established Contributor

Re: My new tool wall

Hooray! A new tool holder.

This one is for three handsaws, or possibly hawks. No, I'm sure they're handsaws. I know the difference.

I wanted some dowel pegs to come out of blocks of wood at an upward angle, but cutting angled holes in wood is a little bit tricky.

I know that with a nice drill stand with adjustable table, a good machinist's vise and a sharp hole saw or preferably a Forstner bit there would be no problems. But sadly I don't have a drill stand, adjustable table or a good vise. And the Forstner bit set I got from Bunnings, well, I won't say they wouldn't cut butter. They would, but you'd have to take it out of the fridge for an hour or so first.

Anyway, enough whining about poor tool purchases. The approach I took was to drill a hole squarely down the middle of a length of wood and then cut off angled blocks.

Sawblade set to random angle that looked good.Sawblade set to random angle that looked good.

After that it was just a matter of sanding everything, gluing the blocks onto a strip of scrap plywood and glueing in the dowels. Let the glue dry, coat of BLO cut with turps and screw it to the tool wall.

 

Assembled and fixed.Assembled and fixed.

 

Screwed into position.Screwed into position.

 

Close up of hanging saw.Close up of hanging saw.

Bob's your uncle. Have a good long weekend, get plenty of shed time!

 

 

Stay safe,
Join your union,

Jim

Re: My new tool wall

My first involvement with workshop.

I am just starting on my shed, a new build in Paynesville, Victoria, Australia.

Glad someone else re-uses bits from disgarded tech. Printers (especially A3 size) have lots of bits to reuse. Any waste bits I sort into materials are deposited at our local tip recycling bins. Find the drive rollers and bearings are absolute top quality and easy to use.

 

Have fun and keep looking for ideas to reuse what is on hand!

 

 

Jason
Community Manager
Community Manager

Re: My new tool wall

Welcome to Workshop @coullone, it's brilliant to have you join the community. I'm sure you will find there's plenty of like-minded people around these parts who are passionate about recycling/upcycling. 

 

How is your shed build going? There would be loads of community members who would be keen to see how it's going. Perhaps you could hit the Start a discussion button and share some photos?

 

Please feel free to post anytime you need a hand with a project or have something to share. We look forward to reading a lot more about your projects and plans. And please let me know if you ever need a hand getting the most from the Workshop site. Sorry about the delay in getting back to you, replies will be more timely next time...    

 

Jason

 

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