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New subway tile kitchen splashback

ProjectPete
Trusted Contributor

New subway tile kitchen splashback

SubwayTile.jpg

Given we were going to do a full kitchen reno but we're instead building a new home, we thought the splashback could at least do with a facelift, especially with how stoked we were with how our laundry reno turned out.

 

So here's a few pics of the process....

 

Before

 

before.jpg

 

Check out the ghastly powerpoints and red exposed on the tiles...

 

Splashback2.jpg

 

So off came the builder spec tiles (mmmmm satisfying)

 

1.jpg

 

Then as with any job, prep prep prep...

 

2.jpg

 

Getting the first row right is critical so take your tie, use your yellow wedge spacers and a spirit level if things are a bit off. I was going on a flat bench in great cond so no real issues for me but something to keep in mind especially if you're bridging a gap for example.

As you move up the wall it gets messy but don't stress, all that excess adhesive is easy to scrap/wipe off once it's all dry. To avoid too much mess a) don't overdo it with the adhesive, and b) just before you place you next tile run you finger along the side and top of the tiles it'll be going next to - it reduces the amount of adhesive that seaps out when you apply some pressure.

 

3.jpg

 

I used a grinder for all my cuts which I find easier for these small (200x100) subway tiles - you just need a steady hand. Obviously a tile cutter is a better way to go for the big tiles. Remember that if you use a grinder you lose about 4mm of the tile for your cut so if you cut a 200mm tile in half at the 100mm mark one piece will be 100mm and the other about 96mm - this is not good when following a pattern so keep the 96mm piece for small cuts you might need to make.

 

Always work with a clean station - it makes for a better end product. I thoroughly cleaned the tiles before startign the dreaded grouting stage. Again, when grouting the excess that gets on the tiles is easy to scrape/clean off so don't let it get to you. One thing I will note is that I personally find it better to focus your grout on the gaps needing grouting rather than smearing it everywhere like some people suggest - saves you cleaning up too much after and I feel it gives a better finish.

 

pregrout.jpg

 

Note from the pic above what this would've looked like with a darker grout which is also common with subway tiles. We went with white to a) make the space look a bit bigger, and b) appeal to more tastes (given we're selling in a year). Make sure you seal the grout!

 

Grouting is done, bit of cleaning to go and silicone for the edges which means it's time to start celebrating :smile: Any excuse'll do for a beer, right?

 

Splashback1.jpg

 

Once the (tedious) silicone is done and the new white slimline powerpoints are on, time to replace the appliances and get the 'after' shot.

 

ppoint1.jpg

 

After

 

after1.jpg

after2.jpg

 

Would love to hear what you think...especially if you (honestly) think it'd make a difference to you opinion of the kitchen as a potential buyer.

 

I'll also be adding some box shelves in the whitespace next but was keen to share this now.

 

Looking forward to sharing the next one with you :smile:

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Handy and helpful
Instagram @projectpete.diy @at.home.rosehill @homeprojectco
Former Workshop member
Not applicable

Re: New subway tile kitchen splashback

G'day @ProjectPete mate,

I haven't completely read through your post yet but what you have done is nearly EXACTLY the same as what I am doing...if I had found this first I likely wouldn't have posted. Seriously I had the same range hood and the same set out for tiles...

The builder of your house didn't happen to think their Homes were a massive Celebration? Just because that is uncanny :surprised:

 

Cheers for the step by step mate :smile:

Peace

Josh

Re: New subway tile kitchen splashback

Quite the coincidence @Former Workshop member - I built that house with Celebration Homes :smile:

 

More recently I've built a new home with Aveling.

 

Where abouts are you located? 

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Handy and helpful
Instagram @projectpete.diy @at.home.rosehill @homeprojectco

Re: New subway tile kitchen splashback

I also added shelving on each side of the range hood essentially sitting on top of the tiles.

 

If you need it, I've done a more detailed guide which @Jason may share soon. 

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Handy and helpful
Instagram @projectpete.diy @at.home.rosehill @homeprojectco
redracer01
Trusted Contributor

Re: Kitchen facelift (subway tile splashback)

As usual @ProjectPete you put us all to shame. This is artwork level tiling! Spot on leveling and so schmick! Must agree that the subway tiles give it that very euro vibe!

I am a Bunnings team member. Any opinions or recommendations shared here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of Bunnings. Visit the Bunnings website for assistance from the customer service team.


Re: Kitchen facelift (subway tile splashback)

No shame at all @redracer01 - we're all in this together :smile:

 

I appreciate the kind words though! I do pride myself on doing my best work all the time. 

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Handy and helpful
Instagram @projectpete.diy @at.home.rosehill @homeprojectco

Re: Kitchen facelift (subway tile splashback)

I reckon we (workshop community) should all gather at your place for a quick bbq feed and enjoy your FIFA room when its done!


I am a Bunnings team member. Any opinions or recommendations shared here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of Bunnings. Visit the Bunnings website for assistance from the customer service team.


gippslandhome
Super Contributor

Re: New subway tile kitchen splashback

Great job @ProjectPete and nice finish with the white. Have to agree that if you are selling that the fresh white grout look is more appealing.

 

Just a note from a tilers perspective, when you pick a notch trowel to use for your tiles, the notch shouldn't be that deep that glue oozes out through the grout joints and over the face of the tiles as pictured.

 

It's much easier to lay the tiles roughly in position without spacers and wipe any excess glue off with clean water and a sponge. Then put the spacers in and again wipe off any excess.

 

It's much easier to clean when it is wet then dry, and the problem is when trying to clean alot of dry glue in the joints you risk chipping the glaze.

 

But end result looks awesome. Thank you for sharing your talents

 

Kind regards Rob 👍

 

 

Re: New subway tile kitchen splashback

Thanks @gippslandhome and I appreciate the points you made. I must say, I've improved my technique over several additional jobs using similar methods to what you've explained.

 

Love continuing learning and improving.

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Handy and helpful
Instagram @projectpete.diy @at.home.rosehill @homeprojectco

Re: New subway tile kitchen splashback

G'day @ProjectPete 

 

One great thing about being in the construction industry is that no matter how old we get we can still keep growing in skills and knowledge.

 

That's what I love about this fabulous community is being able to share knowledge, but more importantly being able to have others share their knowledge.

 

And Pete your skill set and knowledge is such a huge asset to this community.

 

Thanks mate 👍

 

Kind regards Rob

Former Workshop member
Not applicable

Re: New subway tile kitchen splashback


@gippslandhome wrote:

One great thing about being in the construction industry is that no matter how old we get we can still keep growing in skills and knowledge.

That's what I love about this fabulous community is being able to share knowledge, but more importantly being able to have others share their knowledge.

Sorry @ProjectPete as this is hugely off the topic! I'd just like to drop another point of view on that thought - in total agreement @gippslandhome! - but I have encountered in some fields those who are VERY RETICENT to teach or give details of the skills they have learnt.

In some instances there can be liability issues (which I understand so that's OK); but it is a little saddening to put a post down on a forum (not here and totally unrelated topic) asking where I could get more information, training, experience etc...

 

One solitary response from a respected guy in the forum topic said 'no training courses around. Most of us [experienced guys with a heap of knowledge] don't frequent forums because we can't be bothered bickering with arrogant <people :wink:>; we meet up locally in small groups or stay in contact via email'. That response hints at an underlying arrogance issue to me. 'I only talk with people who agree with what I say'...what a loser!

 

My point is what do the next generation learn - albeit if they are willing (:asleep:) - if the older and more experienced guys/ladies have that attitude. My thanks to those who have experience and are willing to spend some time noting down what they know.

Peace

Josh

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