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Hexagon timber shelves

Gareth
Budding Contributor

Hexagon timber shelves

 

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It started with my daughter asking for some hex type shelves and it ended with the wife asking for some shelves for restrooms 

 

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EricL
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: hex shelves

Hi @Gareth

 

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community. Thank you so much for joining us and sharing your amazing Hex shelves project.

 

Those shelves look so cool! The finish on it is so well done. Did you cut the panels with a circular saw? How did you keep the assembly together? Did you use dowels or biscuits between joins? Did you paint it with anything? I'm so sorry for the many questions. I'm sure our members are interested in the details of your build. Any advice or tips for those attempting to duplicate this project would be much appreciated.    

 

We look forward to seeing your next project.

 

Eric

 

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Gareth
Budding Contributor

Re: hex shelves

Hi Eric

thank you for you kind words, I used a drop saw to cut all the sections it was set at 30 degrees, and the turn then upside down and tape them as below

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 then once I had them glued I used a nailer to just ensure there held together, I sanded them down and finished them off just using bees wax,

Gareth

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: hex shelves

Many thanks for the additional images, @Gareth. They'll really assist any of our members wanting to give this project a go.

 

Did you have to use much filler at all, or is your saw just really accurate? I've tried making these before, and the issue I had was setting my saw to precisely 30 degrees. It's not a premium brand, and there is just a screw knob used for adjustment and an arrow indicator that points to the degree needed. It's somewhat accurate to maybe +-1 degree. Instead of cutting at 30 degrees, I'm cutting at perhaps 29 degrees. Since each cut is one degree out, each joint is two degrees out, and there are six joints overall. Two degrees out isn't much on a single joint, but using this tape method, that two-degree error compounds right up until the last joint. The last join is12 degrees out and nowhere near where it needs to be. 

 

I might just need a more accurate saw or to find a way of clamping these up, so the error is split between the individual joins and not compounded until the last.

 

Mitchell

 

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