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How to paint outside windows?

yellowrobyn
New Contributor

How to paint outside windows?

 

Do you need to undercoat surface before applying putty

Why does old putty crack and crinkle.

if it is strong can you put new putty on top of old putty

will using filler such as multfill fill cracks and / smooth surface

what to do ab

 

MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Painting outside windows

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community @yellowrobyn. It's a pleasure to have you join us, and many thanks for your question about applying putty.

 

You might like to start by showing our helpful members what you are working with. If we can see the areas you need to apply putty to, we'll be able to provide much more in-depth advice.

 

Putty can generally be applied over surfaces that are sound and strong. If there is any loose material, remove it before you start. You do not need to apply an undercoat beforehand.

 

Putty can become dry and brittle over time, and as some are not flexible, movement in the structure causes cracking over time. You'll find linseed based window putties will crinkle with old age, but this is normally only evident after 10 years or so. 

 

Earl's MulTfill Ready To Use Filler - 0.140kg White is a fantastic multi-purpose putty that can be used on various surfaces both inside and out. It's designed not to shrink, sink or fall out and, once dry, sands extremely easily.

 

I look forward to seeing some images of the surfaces you wish to repair.

 

Please let me know if you have any questions.

 

Mitchell

 

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yellowrobyn
New Contributor

Re: Painting outside windows

I am having such trouble sending my photos and new message. Will post this to see how I go

Robyn

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Painting outside windows

Robyn (@yellowrobyn), 

 

Feel free to email those images through to us at Workshop@bunnings.com.au and we'll post them for you.

 

Mitchell

 

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yellowrobyn
New Contributor

Re: Painting outside windows

I have been painting my house during lockdowns and have achieved a lot. I now need to paint windows exposed to the weather and they have signs of deterioration.  They don’t have to be perfect but do need to be waterproof. 

I have several issues but thought I would start here.

 

The first photo is an example of the outside. Putty is still solid but cracked and in other places very crinkled.

The second is inside showing water damage. 

In some places putty on the outside etc is below level on inside. Could that contribute to water damage?

Can you put new putty on top of old to repair eg cracks?

Can you use multfill to fill gaps and smooth surface?

 

Thank you 

 

putty1.jpgPutty2.jpg

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Painting outside windows

Hi @yellowrobyn,

 

Many thanks for the additional images and details.

 

That exterior picture appears to illustrate a fairly standard look for aged linseed-based glazing putty. First, I believe it would be a good idea to determine if there are any water leaks. Is the timber inside the window spongy or rotted? I can see a little bit of deterioration, but that could just be the filler, and it doesn't necessarily reflect that there's a leak.

 

For instance, please take a look at the window putty used on the property I rent.

IMG_20210816_082034672.jpgIMG_20210816_082129206.jpg

IMG_20210816_082120862.jpg

 

Someone very inexperienced has used glazing putty themselves and done a horrific job. Saying that, though, there are no leaks. The putty doesn't always need to look perfect to seal water out. If there are no leaks in your instance, you might be able to get a better look by skim coating over it without having to redo the putty completely. This would be optimal, as I must say, glazing putty is not particularly pleasant to use. It's sticky and doesn't smooth out like a cement-based filler.

 

You might like to start by taking a flat head screwdriver and doing a bit of exploratory work on the inside of the window. Have a little dig around those areas hard up against the glass. If that is just putty and not rotted timber, then you'll be able to sand it back and just fill the area with Earl's MulTfill Ready To Use Filler - 0.140kg White.

 

If there are no signs of water damage to the interior, I would suggest possibly leaving the exterior alone. If you don't like the crinkled look, you could attempt to sand it smooth and then fill over it.

 

Let me know how you go.

 

Mitchell

 

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yellowrobyn
New Contributor

Re: Painting outside windows

Thank you so helpful. 

When you say skim over it do you mean with putty or something else?

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Painting outside windows

@yellowrobyn,

 

I apologise. Yes, apply a skim coat (thin application) of putty over the existing putty. You could attempt to use Selleys 450g Linseed Oil Special Putty, and it would certainly be a learning experience. However, you might find that if you were to sand the crinkled window putty, it could remove most of that distortion. You'd then apply a thin application of Earl's MulTfill Ready To Use Filler - 0.140kg White over the area to fill in any cracks before painting.

 

Mitchell

 

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