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Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

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Budding Contributor

Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

Hi All,

 

I'm looking at converting my double garage to a workshop (car will be outside when working as well). So I use to be a woodworking student 15 years ago before going to to white collar work but looking to get back into it and tools have changed/improved since.

I am wondering what tools I should buying. I have created a list have noticed I am mainly using ryobi/aeg due to their competitive prices and long warranty period, as well as going corded vs cordless. I am considering makita for some of the saws/jigsaw since their cheaper ones are quite affordable but not sure on durability.

 

I already own the ryobi cordless drill and impact driver kit.

 

Below is a list of wants. i have chosen based on functionality, and other buyer's review of the product. Please comment if I should get something else, corded vs cordless.

Mitre Saw: AEG 1800W 254mm Dual Bevel Slide Compound Mitre Saw 

Circular Saw: AEG 1200W 184mm Circular Saw 

Orbital Sander: AEG 300W 125mm Random Orbital Sander  or Ryobi 300W Random Orbital Sander

Jigsaw: AEG 700W Variable Speed Jigsaw  or Ryobi 600W 85mm Jigsaw

ShopVac: Ryobi 1500W 30L Wet and Dry Vacuum 

 

Will buy down the track: Comment if I should get it earlier

Brad Nailer: Ryobi cordless ones. Haven't done much research on which one to get

Drill Press: Ryobi model

Planner: Ryobi?

 

If I'm missing anything to get started please also let me know.

 

Thanks!!!!

zool3

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Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community @zool3. It's great to have you join us and many thanks for your question.

 

You can't really go wrong with AEG tools or Ryobi for that matter. I believe any of the tools you have selected are going to do a fine job for many projects around the home. What sort of projects do you wish to complete? Would it involve any fine joinery or very precise woodworking?

 

It's interesting to see you've selected corded equipment over the battery alternatives. Is there a reason behind this? There is absolutely nothing wrong with corded equipment, in some cases being the better option, but the trend has been towards battery units for the last several years and I'd be interested to know your thoughts. There's a quite longrunning discussion Tools - battery or corded? by @ProjectPete which you might find of interest. Personally, I have a mix of both and use each of them in different ways.

 

Here are some previous discussions about purchasing tools for woodworking:

 

 

 

 

 

For the "down the track" tools, I would buy them when you need them. Unless you are going to make full use of them now there are many more woodworking accessories which your budget would be better spent on. A good set of multisized clamps for one thing. You can never have too many clamps.

 

Let me mention some of our keen woodworkers @r23on, @Poppop, @Tara86 and @prettyliving to see if they'd like to contribute to the discussion.

 

Mitchell

 

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Budding Contributor

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

Hi Mitchell,

 

Thanks for a detailed reply.

 

I'm hoping to building some furniture for the house - dining table, shelfs, side tables, drawers, garage storage etc so there would be some precise woodworking.

 

Battery vs Corded

Cost

I guess it just comes down to cost since I am just starting off. I went with cordless drills because that makes sense when going up ladders for curtain installation as an example. As for the saws, I figured I'll just be in my garage so the hazard isn't a problem as I plan to have the power cable hang from the ceiling vs on the floor. Cordless skin are quite expensive, and then getting a 4ah or 5ah battery + an extra charger it just adds on to the cost. Corded tools just gives me the reliability and more power. But it would be good to read other people's thought or to counter argue my thought. I'm quite new to this so it would be great to great more insight.

Brand diversification

Since I have roybi cordless, i would just stick to it, otherwise I need to get more batteries/charger for other brands. You have no limit to brand choice for corded tools

 

Clamps

Based on my project which size clamps should I be getting to start off with? And how many do I need of each.

 

Thanks again :smile: 

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Experienced Contributor

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

"Drill Press: Ryobi model"

 

This one?

I'd look for a pedestal drill with more grunt - especially if you consider using large hole saws in the future with your woodwork.

 

Does anyone know why Ryobi perforated the induction motor casing with hundreds of ventilation(?) slots in the casing?

Up close you can even see the copper coils and wiring inside....just seems cheap and wrong to me.

 

20201120_105848.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

@zool3,

 

The AEG range would be more than suitable for what you have described. 

 

That's exactly how I started off buying power tools. I would get what I could afford which was the corded options and they have served their purpose well. You might find in the future you wish to have a bit more freedom of movement and consider adding a few battery tools to your ensemble.

 

Clamp wise I'm a fan of Irwin Quick-grips as I've used them fairly extensively. I do have more budget-friendly clamps but they just don't clamp with the same degree of force as the Irwin variety. If I was to go out and buy them today I would get four Irwin 610mm Quick-Grip Medium Duty Bar Clamp and four Irwin 300mm Quick-Grip Mini Bar Clamp. That sounds like a bit to spend on clamps but they really are a necessity and should last a very long time. When I look at the money I have spent on tools to do one specific job the cost of those clamps which will do multiple projects isn't so bad.

 

Mitchell

 

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Budding Contributor

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

https://www.bunnings.com.au/ryobi-390w-13mm-drill-press_p6210442

 

this is the one i saw online. It's currently on a want list. I'll accumulate tools as required

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Budding Contributor

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

Thanks Mitchell.

 

I'll have to mix and match my tools. I'll probably stick with AEG corded (ciruclar and jigsaw) since the pricing is very close to to Ryobi. Although Makita corded saws aren't that expensive either but the 6 year warranty on AEG is hard to pass.,I will go with cordless ryobi since I already have 2 batteries and have seen good reviews and are much more affordable for the DIYer.

 

 

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Super Contributor

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

In the end it will boil down to what you will pay. Having said that the list of tools supplied I would not go past for quality But I only buy top end for long jeopardy. Enjoy the decision 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

It's hard to compile a tool "want list" unless A, you know what sort of projects you'll be working on or B, you have the money to buy one of everything in the Bunnings catalogue. My tool list has grown as i the need arises. I started out building my garden bridges and wishing wells with a hand saw, a power drill and a Workmate vice bench.

                 

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Experienced Contributor

Re: Creating a workshop, need some power tool suggestions

Noyade

Most likely reason for perforations is to help disapate heat. As current flows through the armature / coils it generates heat. Unfortunately as the wires get hotter they cause resistance which in turn reduces the power of the drill. Same reason why if you are having trouble starting a car you only do quick burst not long continuous cranking as the starter motor gets hot and needs more electricity for same power.  JDE

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