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Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

JaneK
Moderator
Moderator

Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

I don't want to jinx myself, but this year for the very first time, I think I have managed to grow basil from seed. I've been lucky to have a very productive herb garden but I've never had much luck with basil or coriander. I'm not sure if it's the location or the watering regime but I'm determined to keep on trying.

 

This got me thinking about which herbs the gardeners of Bunnings Workshop might struggle with.

 

If you had to, from easiest to hardest to grow, how would you rank the following herbs? 

  • Basil
  • Chives
  • Dill
  • Mint
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Rosemary
  • Thyme

 

EASIEST | Rosemary > Mint > Oregano > Parsley > Thyme > Chives > Dill > Basil > Coriander | HARDEST

 

Jane

 

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Rach23
Junior Contributor

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Most of the above herbs I haven’t tried growing so I can’t comment on the whole list but the hardest herb for myself would definitely definitely have to be chives. I gave up after 2 packets of seeds.

 

Coriander was hard and also never grew much until I stumbled on this weird method of just sprinkling the seeds on top of the sugarcane mulch (there is potting mix underneath the mulch) and lightly smooshed the mulch over with my fingertips to slightly cover the seeds and watered every few days. I don’t know why but it just works for me. Found this method when I went away and my coriander plants went to seed. Rather than yanking plant out and starting again, I just pulled the seeds off the plant and sprinkled on top of the mulch and was pleasantly surprised when they started growing by themselves.

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Hi @Rach23,

 

That sounds like a brilliant method for germinating your coriander; I'll have to try that next time. I trust our members would love to see some images of your herbs if you'd like to share them with us.

 

Mitchell

 

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bergs
Super Contributor

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Hi

I haven't grown all those herbs  but of the ones I have, I would rate them like this.

 

Parsley; (Italian & Curly Leaf) After Initially growing in the garden, they now self seeds everywhere, so when any one wants parsley they know I'll                        have some growing.

 

Mint; Grown in pots. Keep it moist & trimmed and will produce plenty. Generally plenty on hand. Don't let it get into the garden beds as it is very invasive.

 

Mustard greens; I grow in tubs and use the leaves when small to mix with other herbs. Will grow large and self seeds easily.

 

Thyme; Grown in tubs and will self seed if conditions right.

 

Chives/Garlic Chives; Normally easy to grow either in pots or herb patch. This year had no end of trouble with black Aphids.

                                      Cut back hard and will reshoot. Can get a bit invasive if let to seed.(Especially the Garlic Chives)

 

👍🍻 bergs

 

Be happy and care for your tools
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Chaks_DIY
Super Contributor

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Hi there.

 

It's been a mixed bag in my experience but here is my list. Though I can't say I'm ever deterred from trying again with the hardest ones 😃

Thyme > Rosemary > Mint > Oregano > Parsley > Dill > Chives > Basil 

 

Regards 

----
Yours Kindly. For more, please follow @hausdiy_weekender
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Elisha007
Budding Contributor

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Each year I have corriander pop up every where. I don't know how it manages to grow as most of my yard is small white stones. I did grow Corriander a few years ago in a garden bed but now it just pops up all over the place and I'm forever pulling it all out 😁.

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bergs
Super Contributor

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Hi.

All plants run to seed sometime or other.

They will germinate anywhere they can if the conditions a right, especially herbs and some can get very invasive.

 

If you don't want them to spring up in all the nooks and crannies around your garden, then you'll have to remove the plant or seed heads, unless you want them everywhere.

 

Don't forget to save some seeds for the next sowing.

 

You can do this by tying a bag or something like that, over the seed head to catch the seed. 

 

👍🍻 bergs

Be happy and care for your tools
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Brad
Trusted Contributor

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Parsley is going nuts, Mint is much larger but something likes how it tastes too, Sage is bigger but something loves it too, Rosemary, various Basil and Thyme are slower taking off and Vietnamese Mint has been around the longest but done the least. Out of our must haves we have used zero this year so far.

 

Things we do use Coriander, Ginger, Garlic and Garlic Leaves, Spring Onions, Chinese Spinach, Chilis, Bok Choy, Red and Green Peppers (Not the sort you grind for Pepper, they are more of a balance to hot Chili ) and some things I have no idea what they are. I have according to her too many Chili plants but she still buys them at the Asian grocery store, Ginger and Galangal that neither have made a move yet and 1 from 2 of Garlic that she rejected but I stuck in a pot anyway rather than the compost bin.

 

I have been told to plant Coriander and I have some market Chili seeds planted and I have seeds for Serrano Chili, Rocket Wasabi, Pai Tsai, Garland Chrysanthemum, Chinese Broccoli, Water Cress and Winged Beans, missing is Kang Kong.

 

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Rach23
Junior Contributor

Re: Ranking herbs from easiest to hardest to grow

Wow!! Your garden sounds great!!

Kang Kong ... you can buy the veg at most Asian grocery shops ... snip off a piece at the end and stick in the ground rather than try to grow from seed. We are in autumn and it’s getting cold here in Melbourne so mine is starting to flower/seed but if you have a greenhouse or live in sunnier/warmer area, it may grow otherwise wait until spring 

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