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Options for soundproofing windows which are not double glazing

wendalls
Budding Contributor

Options for soundproofing windows which are not double glazing

Curtains.pngWe are sleeping in a bedroom which has a window to a busy street.

What are some simple ways we can sound proof without double glazing? At this stage we are not sure whether that cost would be acceptable since we may be not living here long.

How about these curtains https://www.acousticblindsandcurtains.com.au/

Or Magnitite? https://www.magnetite.com.au/

 

Thank you in advance.

 

 

MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Options for soundproofing windows which are not double glazing

Hi @wendalls,

 

The first step to soundproofing windows is minimising any air gaps with foam or sealant. You'll want to add the foam stripping around the window and where it meets the sill. This foam gets compressed when the window is closed.

 

Hanging a triple weave fabric curtain will help block some sound. I've also heard of D.I.Y. secondary glazing where a sheet of perspex is added internally to the window. I would imagine a twin wall polycarbonate might have some effect. A temporary solution would be attaching this with double-sided tape.

 

You might like to read through these previous topics: How to sound proof a bedroom? by @gc and Double glazed windows to reduce road noise? by @Kim

 

Let me mention the knowledgeable @TedBear to see if he can think of any solutions.

 

Mitchell

 

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TedBear
Super Contributor

Re: Options for soundproofing windows which are not double glazing

I think Mitchell's idea of sealing any gaps would be a good start (use dense rubber strip, not the light holey stuff). It made a huge difference when I did that on my front door. I did it to stop air leaking heat in and out, but was immediately surprised at how much the outside sounds dropped too.

I am not sure about those acoustic curtains from  https://www.acousticblindsandcurtains.com.au/   ...??

Their website says that the sound dropped by 10dB, which they say is equivalent to half the level....   that is incorrect. 3dB is half the level, so the sound blocking should have been stated as much lower, or the dB level as smaller. (3dB sound more realistic than 10dB from curtains, but that doesn't look as good in the advertising.)  It makes me think the company may know about selling curtains and nice dreams, but perhaps doesn't know much about sound.  I would want to do more research to establish any real facts before buying those.

The secondary glazing, similar to the Magnitite idea should help, but whatever you use needs to be a material (eg glass) that is dense, since it is he density of the matieral that absorbs sound, not the shape or it's thickness.

(I therefore doubt that the twin wall carbonate will be effective enough as it doesn't have the density to absorb the sound. However, it is relatively cheap, so you could give it a go and see if it blocks enough.)

But I found with my bedroom, which we just sound-lowered this month, is that much of the external sound was coming through the ceiling. Maybe that's not the same for you, especially if you are in a multi-storey situation, but if you have plaster ceilings that entry point will be worth considering too.

We had double glazed windows fitted (for temperature control) and they do lower the sound substantially. (I haven't done a Db test, but writing this has inspired me do so out of interest, just not right now.)

We can test that they are effective by just opening a window when there is a source of noise outside. But we were still plagued by a noisy next door neighbour's sharp voice at night (they seem to live outdoors at night. Curse this wonderful WA weather!! Just kidding of course.), so I had sound insulating batts put in the bedroom ceilings (with heat insulation on top) and that lowered the sound heaps. We can still hear the outside world if it's loud enough, (it would feel eerie if we couldn't hear anything) but not enough sound gets through to stop us sleeping now. The neighbour can happily screech away.  I hope my own recent experience with the issue helps you to consider the options.

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Options for soundproofing windows which are not double glazing

Many thanks for your input @TedBear. I trust @wendalls will appreciate your firsthand experience.

 

Mitchell

 

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redracer01
Trusted Contributor

Re: Options for soundproofing windows which are not double glazing

Hello @wendalls 

 

If the majority of the sound is coming through the window I suggest using a Bastion 1200 x 600 x 50mm XPS Multi-Use Insulation Foam Board. You can easily cut this foam board to the interior size of the window and push fit in to the frame of the window to give you a 100 percent sound seal. When it comes time to take it out you can simply use the back end of a spoon and pop it out. This is a temporary fix and will not cost you a lot. It won't be pretty but I'm sure you can find a spot to hide it away for the day until it is time to go to bed. Good luck and stay safe!

 

Cheers,

Red

 

Screenshot_2021-02-02 Bastion 1200 x 600 x 50mm XPS Multi-Use Insulation Foam Board.png

 

 

 

 


I am a Bunnings team member. Any opinions or recommendations shared here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of Bunnings.
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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Options for soundproofing windows which are not double glazing

Great idea @redracer01, a simple solution that should make a big difference!

 

Mitchell

 

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