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Fire pit

MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Fire pit

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community @kjbuckett. It's fabulous that you've joined us, and many thanks for your question.

 

Let me mention @cadsman to see if they can provide any more information on their project. It appears they have used a concrete block similar to Ezi Wall Lite Retaining Wall Block Charcoal and a refractory cement like Lanko 5kg 156 High Temperature Mortar.

 

If you were only going to construct the lower section and not raise it as high, then the mortar might not be necessary.

 

We look forward to hearing all about your projects and plans around the house and garden and would encourage you to let us know anytime you need assistance or have something to share. As you've seen, our clever and creative members constantly share their ideas here and provide fantastic inspiration here every day.

 

Mitchell

 

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lost89577
Budding Contributor

Re: Fire pit

note: if anyone is worried about burning the tiles or the ground underneath,this will not stop all the heat but will reduce it intensity.

- crushed glass with pavers / bricks

- crushed glass with fibro sheet and tiles on top

- hebal blocks / panel

- hebal blocks / panel and tiles on top

 

Also if you want to build this on a wooden deck this is not the best solution

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2ndhomeowner
Newbie

Re: Fire pit

Does anyone know what blocks are suitable to construct a fire pit out of so they are not at risk of the block exploding?

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StevieB
Projects Editor
Projects Editor

Re: Fire pit

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community @2ndhomeowner. It's fantastic to see you jumping straight in and asking your first question in the community. 

 

Let me tag @cadsman and @MitchellMc who may be able to offer suggestions. You may also like to take a look at @Adam_W's guide about how to build a fire pit.

 

We'd love to hear all about your fire pit project. Feel free to create your own post to tell us about your project, ask any questions and keep the community updated along the way.

 

Stevie

 

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Adam_W
Valued Contributor

Re: Fire pit

Good question @2ndhomeowner 
Technically any bricks or blocks used where there is direct contact with flames should be 'refractory' or heat resistant products. I digress but... I cringe when I see various DIY 'gurus' make fire-pits with regular blocks and then hold them together with construction glue...
Single best way is to contact the supplier or manufacturer as some blocks may be suitable for such use but not technically be 'refractory' products. I would imagine that any product with a BAL-FZ rating would actually be suitable.
Other option is just to use a drop-in fire pit that's designed for the purpose.

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Fire pit

Hi @2ndhomeowner and welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community.

 

It's great to see you've already received a helpful reply from the knowledgeable @Adam_W. To follow on from his advice, our Ezi Wall Lite Retaining Wall Block Charcoal requires a steel buffer between them and the fire. This could be a sheet of steel run around the inside perimeter or as @Adam_W mentioned, perhaps you could have a Jumbuck Rustic Iron Fire Bowl with Stand in the middle to hold the fire and then clad around it with the blocks. Whichever method you choose, the bricks can not be in direct contact with the flames.

 

Please let us know if you need further information or have questions.

 

Mitchell

 

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TedBear
Valued Contributor

Re: Fire pit

I have just come across this post in November, so there's time before next winter to make one...  including a metal inner to contain the fire as suggested by @MitchellMc is a great idea and could provide an extra benefit not yet mentioned:

If you also leave some air gaps in the lower brick work you will create a smoke free effect. It works by the cooler air entering below and being warmed by the hot steel as it passes by it. This then rises and creates an invisible chimney (ie a curtain of rising warm air) that directs the smoke upwards instead of it wallowing around into where you are sitting. It will work best if the gap between liner and outer wall is small, so maybe choose your steel inner container first.

[On a still, cold night our body heat creates an updraft which can attract smoke, so that feeling that the campfire smoke is following you no matter where you sit, is actually true.]

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Noyade
Valued Contributor

Re: Fire pit

"Grand Rugrats love toasting stuff at their own height."

 

I got the impression (probably wrong) that the fire in the photo is in a steel fire-pit and the brick work is merely a windbreak and which also prevents the children from venturing too close to the fire?

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EricL
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Fire pit

Hi @Noyade

 

Let me tag @cadsman to make them aware of your question. As advised by our very knowledgeable members, it's recommended to have a steel firepit if you're not using refractory or heat-resistant bricks. 

 

Eric

 

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