Workshop
Ask a question

The Bunnings Workshop community can help with your home improvement projects.

How to build a console table

MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Difficulty: Beginner

Console, hallway or entryway tables are a great way to add style and storage to your space. Building these narrow tables is a quick and easy D.I.Y. project perfect for beginners.

 

Here is a guide to building a console table using a live edge panel and hairpin legs. You can customise the table’s size and look according to your preferences.

 

As this project involves power tools, please follow all safety guidelines provided by manufacturers and use the recommended protective gear, including safety glasses and gloves.

Steps

Step 1

Cut the live edge panel.

 

Determine your table’s length. To prevent your panel from bowing, keep the table's length less than 1200mm.

 

Use a mitre square to mark your desired length on the panel. Ensure the marked line is straight. Carefully cut along the line using a circular saw. Don’t forget to wear the recommended personal protective equipment (PPE) while cutting, including gloves and safety glasses.

 

Now use the 180-grit sandpaper to smooth the edges of the cut wood. This will eliminate any splinters and give your table a rounded finish.

 

1.1 Measuring length of table.jpg  1.2 Cutting timber to length.jpg  1.3 Sanding sharp corners.jpg

 

Step 2

Drill screw locations for the table’s legs.

 

A live edge panel has two edges. The straight edge will form the back of the table while the contoured edge will be the table’s front.

 

Position one leg in the corner of the straight edge and mark the screw locations on the underside of the panel.

 

Place a second leg on the contoured edge, spacing it approximately 15mm from the other leg. This will ensure the second leg is around 20mm from the front edge of the table. Mark the screw locations for this leg as well.

 

Remove the legs. Now use a drill driver and a 2mm drill bit to carefully predrill holes measuring 20mm in depth at the marked locations. Make sure not to penetrate the top of the panel while drilling.

 

Repeat the same process for the other end of the panel. 

 

2.1 Marking screw locations for legs.jpg  2.2 Front and back leg positioned.jpg  2.3 Drilling screw pilot holes.jpg

 

 

Step 3

Varnish the panel's underside.


Pour a small amount of varnish into your paint tray and apply it on the panel's underside using a mini paint roller. Spread the varnish evenly, being mindful of any potential drips on the edges of the panel. If any drips occur, wipe them away with a cloth.


Allow the varnish to dry for at least two hours. Once dry, secure the four legs to the panel using 25mm screws. You now have a table with legs.

 

3.1 Applying varnish to underside of tabletop.jpg  3.2 Screwing legs on to tabletop.jpg

 

Step 4

Varnish the top of the table.

 

Carefully flip the table over so that it stands on its legs.

 

Pour a small amount of varnish into the paint tray and apply a thin coat on the top of the table. Ensure that you coat all four edges as well. Wipe away any dripping varnish using a cloth.

 

Allow the varnish to dry for at least two hours.

 

4.1 Applying first coat of varnish to top.jpg  4.2 Applying varnish to edges.jpg

 

 

Step 5

Sand the top of the table.

 

After the varnish in the previous step has dried, the table's surface may feel rough due to the raised grain.

 

Gently sand along the table's length using 180-grit sandpaper. Follow the timber's natural grain. Avoid sanding across the table as this may cause scratches.

 

Remove any sanding dust with a cloth once the surface feels smooth.

 

5.1 Lightly sanding varnish.jpg  5.2 Wiping dust off top.jpg

 

Step 6

Apply a second coat of varnish.

 

Varnish the top of the table again. Start by spreading the varnish evenly across the table and then apply it along the table’s length. Avoid leaving thicker sections of varnish as these may appear as opaque white areas on your table.


Once this coat is dry, you can repeat this step and add additional coats until you achieve your desired level of sheen.

 

You have now successfully built a console table. Place it in position and accessorise to suit.

 

6.1 Applying second varnish coat.jpg  6.2 Laying off second coat of varnish.jpg  6.3 Completed console table.png

 

Materials

Tools

  • Drill driver
  • Circular saw
  • 180-grit sandpaper
  • 2mm drill bit
  • Mini paint roller
  • Paint tray
  • Clean cloth
  • Mitre square
  • Safety gear, including face mask, gloves and safety glasses.

Images

1.1 Measuring length of table.jpg  1.2 Cutting timber to length.jpg  1.3 Sanding sharp corners.jpg  2.1 Marking screw locations for legs.jpg  2.2 Front and back leg positioned.jpg  2.3 Drilling screw pilot holes.jpg  3.1 Applying varnish to underside of tabletop.jpg  3.2 Screwing legs on to tabletop.jpg  4.1 Applying first coat of varnish to top.jpg  4.2 Applying varnish to edges.jpg  5.1 Lightly sanding varnish.jpg  5.2 Wiping dust off top.jpg  6.1 Applying second varnish coat.jpg  6.2 Laying off second coat of varnish.jpg  6.3 Completed console table.png

 

3 Replies
Akanksha
Projects Editor
Projects Editor

Thanks Mitchell.

 

A console table is an easy and efficient way to spruce up an entryway or hallway. Find more ideas for your space in 10 ways to refresh your entryway and in the Top 10 most popular indoor furniture projects shared on Workshop. 

 

Please don't hesitate to let us know if you have any questions. We're here to assist.

 

Akanksha 

mich1972
Kind of a Big Deal

Looks great Mitch 😃

Tinker_Bell
Having an Impact

Perfect weekend project! Nice one @MitchellMc.

 

Why join the Bunnings Workshop community?

Workshop is a friendly place to learn, get ideas and find inspiration for your home improvement projects