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How to power a cricket bowling machine 500W through 12v DC battery

attique
Budding Contributor

Re: How to power a cricket bowling machine 500W through 12v DC battery

Excellent. Thanks a lot for your help :smile: 

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Jason
Community Manager
Community Manager

Re: How to power a cricket bowling machine 500W through 12v DC battery

@attique 

 

I play (poorly) for the mighty Bulleen Bulls in the Eastern Cricket Association here in Melbourne. 

 

Looking forward to seeing your bowling machine in action soon.

 

Great to see you've been getting plenty of help with it.

 

Jason

 

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MikeTNZ
Established Contributor

Re: How to power a cricket bowling machine 500W through 12v DC battery

Hi there @attique,

This sort of thing intrigues me somewhat.

The whole thing runs with some sort of a motor, meaning that it won't be a constant mechanical load and therefore won't have a constant current draw either, which will affect the supply from the inverter and the current supplied by the battery.

To get the motor spinning in the first place, there will be a certain amount of "initial load current", this could be anywhere from 3-5 times the normal run current, all motors have this anomaly to them.

2 hours is a long time to have any motor running, however if you are stopping and starting it, your battery capacity is going to be seriously lessened by the ILC, every time it starts.

Also, how do you plan on charging the battery?

With inverters, don't ever buy a cheap one, I've done lots of work with them over the last 10 or so years and some are not what they say they are.

A lot of the cheaper ones use pulse-width modulation to turn a square wave into a sine wave, poorly, I might add, it will not only (over time) burn out any electronics connected down the line to it, but they are also terrible for causing all sorts of radio/TV interference for 100's of metres around them.

Battery-wise, I would go for two batteries connected together in parallel, rather than one large one, this will extend the life of the pair of them.

Irregardless of what sort of battery you get, please make sure you buy the correct charger, deep cycle batteries need an intelligent charger, not just your usual 12v car battery charger, using something like that will seriously shorten the life of the internal cells.

 

I hope that this has been of some help, attique, if not, ask away below!

 

Cheers,

Mike T.

 

 

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