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Reducing your power bill

Kermit
Trusted Contributor

Re: Reducing your power bill

Some good tips and tricks in this video:

 

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Andy_Mann
Former Community Member

Re: Reducing your power bill

My intent in this post is to offer guidance, but I'm aware that it may ruffle feathers.

 

There's been lots of discussion on how to tweak existing homes to conserve energy, or do things smarter, but I think it's even more important that people weigh up potentially higher energy consumption, when planning their renos.

 

If a reno will bring endless pleasure, & money's not an issue, then by all means go for it.

 

Unfortunately most people aren't in that position, but energy onsellers aren't selective, they'll happily supply the extra energy to customers that get seduced by consumerism.

 

If anyone plans to take out an insulated wall (as an example), & open rooms to the outside with expanses of glass, sliding or not, they will pay for the priviledge, & keep paying for it. Even double glazed can't match the R-rating of a well insulated wall.

 

I urge people to take caution when planning renos, they're costly enough to do as it is, without the extra burden of the ongoing energy charges that aren't going away.

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Jason
Community Manager
Community Manager

Re: Reducing your power bill

I hope everyone managed to stay warm over the weekend. It was a really cold one down here in Melbourne. 

 

Feel free to share your tips for how to winter-proof your home. 

 

There's also some great advice in the video below.

 

Jason

 

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Andy_Mann
Former Community Member

Re: Reducing your power bill

@Jason

 

While I like most of that video, suggesting the double glazed alumimium framed windows from the Bunnings catalogue, doesn't sit well with me.

Aluminium is a good conductor, so for the frame to be thermally insulative/effective, there needs to be an insulation barrier to separate the outside conductive frame, from the inside conductive frame.

As an analogy, it's a bit like using large uninsulated steel beams as the structural framework, then splurging on high R rated walls between them. The uninsulated steel frame, provides an easy path for unwanted heating, or heatloss.

If anyone has small wooden framed windows, forget double glazing, it's not cost effective.

For those with large aluminium windows, I'd highly recommend installing a persplex panel on the interior side of the frame, a small distance apart from the existing glass, making sure that the enclosed air gap is intimately sealed, so that the insulative value of the air gap won't be compromised.

I'm sorry Bunnings if I've put your nose out of joint, but this is a DIY forum, & if you promote expensive sub par products for customers to save money, I will pass on what I know, so that Workshoppers can make an educated decision.

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Jason
Community Manager
Community Manager

Re: Reducing your power bill

Thanks for your feedback @Andy_Mann, I will pass it on. 

 

Jason

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Isobel
Trusted Contributor

Re: Reducing your power bill

The big one from me is to have a few rugs on the couch so I stay warm and cozy when reading or watching TV rather than being tempted to keep putting the heater on higher. 

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Henno
Experienced Contributor

Re: Reducing your power bill

I might be a bit of an obsessive compulsive with this, but if I can save myself cash and help save the planet at the same time, then I'm OK with turning off lights when not in the room, switching off the HWS at the fuse box when we go away for the weekend and switching off my beer fridge every other day. Doing these small things all contribute to making things better for us all.
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Isobel
Trusted Contributor

Re: Reducing your power bill

This is good news: http://www.domain.com.au/news/solarpowered-tesla-town-coming-to-inner-melbourne-20160721-gq9nbh/

 

Be great to see it become mandatory that new houses are built with solar panels and battery storage. 

 

This is also great: Within the suburb will be communal charging stations for electric cars and interconnected bike paths. 

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Brad
Trusted Contributor

Re: Reducing your power bill


@Andy_Mann wrote:

@Jason

 

While I like most of that video, suggesting the double glazed alumimium framed windows from the Bunnings catalogue, doesn't sit well with me.

Aluminium is a good conductor, so for the frame to be thermally insulative/effective, there needs to be an insulation barrier to separate the outside conductive frame, from the inside conductive frame.

As an analogy, it's a bit like using large uninsulated steel beams as the structural framework, then splurging on high R rated walls between them. The uninsulated steel frame, provides an easy path for unwanted heating, or heatloss.

If anyone has small wooden framed windows, forget double glazing, it's not cost effective.

For those with large aluminium windows, I'd highly recommend installing a persplex panel on the interior side of the frame, a small distance apart from the existing glass, making sure that the enclosed air gap is intimately sealed, so that the insulative value of the air gap won't be compromised.

I'm sorry Bunnings if I've put your nose out of joint, but this is a DIY forum, & if you promote expensive sub par products for customers to save money, I will pass on what I know, so that Workshoppers can make an educated decision.


@Andy_Mann

 

I take it your refering to the Polar window and door range? I have been trying to look into them for the shed, while there is some info on the manufacturers page on windows the design page to order the doors has no info and limited options. Frustrating to the point of having a diy wooden option looking less stressful. With no store in SA having any of the range I can find the poor special orders people are stuck with the same lack of information. I don't see a way around a solid metal window transfering energy through the frame, it is a trade off to keep the gas seal...

 

Diy double glazing you do have to be careful of condensation in your air gap, humid days are a no no for making your seal and most of the pros use argon gas.

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Andy_Mann
Former Community Member

Re: Reducing your power bill

@Brad, I did some digging around after seeing your post about the lack of information regarding the Polar double glazed windows.

Here's their flyer pdf, which doesn't inspire confidence.

They are built to Australian standards, check out the COMPLIANCE section on page 4 of this link:

 

http://www2.polarwindows.com.au/Polar%20Windows%20Brochure%20Oct12.pdf

 

Here's the part that I'm referring to, so that there's no ambiguity.

 
COMPLIANCE
All Polar Eco-View Windows are compliant
to the relevant codes;
NCC (National Construction Code)
formally BCA
AS2047
AS1288, AS2208
AS/NZ1170
AS3959
All products are independently tested and
certified by NATA approved laboratories
and come with a 6 Year Warranty.
Polar Eco-View Windows are also members
of the AWA (Australian Window Association)
WERS (Window Energy Rating Scheme) and
the HIA (Housing Industry Australia).
 
End of quote.
 
The 6 year warranty is pathetic.
 
Thankfully, I looked elsewhere & came across these guys:
 
 
Check out the "Double Glazing - Benefits" from the left hand selection menu.
 
Once there, take particular notice of the conbtents of, "Energy Efficiency". ; )
 
Enjoy.
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