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How to save our Imperial Mandarin?

John57
Having an Impact

How to save our Imperial Mandarin?

From the start of planting 4 years ago, this dwarf tree quickly became one sided. The leaves fell off and branches died on one side of the tree.

One day a gardener tried pulling back the soil and found the non damaged side quite secure. So he left it where it was.

The pics are recent. The fruit is abundant and small but healthy.

How can we rehabilitate the tree? What’s plan should we follow? 
One Neighbour suggested take off all the fruit, prune back hard, fertilize and protect from frost.

We have routinely fertilized since we got it with Osmocote, and once a year worm hit. Compost has been applied too.

It seems to something wrong with the root system. It’s embedded in good quality soil with a clay base. We grow other citrus veggies and herbs in the same garden with no problems. 
I’m going to search root problems with citrus! 
Thank you in advance for your recommendations,

John

 

In the photos you can see the bare branches at the backside near the fence.

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: Help save our Imperial Mandarin

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community @John57. It's fantastic to have you join us, and many thanks for your question about Mandarin care.
 

It appears the issues could be due to poor drainage, particularly on the backside, where the branches have died. Inspect the soil periodically to see if it remains waterlogged for a significant time after watering or rain. This can indicate poor drainage, which could be exacerbating root problems.

 

A tree planted on top of a clay base can face numerous issues, such as hindered root growth and poor water drainage. If water drains across the clay base and causes the roots at the rear to remain constantly wet, this could be the source of your tree's problems. Consider amending the soil with organic matter to improve aeration, and install drainage around the root zone if necessary. You might also consider transplanting the tree to a more suitable location with better drainage to ensure its long-term health and vitality.

 

Prune dead or diseased branches to enhance air circulation and sunlight penetration, balancing the canopy for even growth and remove the existing fruit to help the tree redirect its energy towards recovery. By addressing these issues, along with any drainage concerns, your tree should gradually recover and begin to thrive.

 

Here are a couple of helpful guides: How to plant, grow and care for a mandarin tree and How to diagnose a sick plant.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Mitchell
 

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Re: Help save our Imperial Mandarin

A comprehensive solution Mitchell, many thanks to you.

Sincerely

John

Re: Help save our Imperial Mandarin

Picked the mandarins but not yet moved the tree, its too cold and wet!

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