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How To Repair a Trip Hazard

FrankieL
Newbie

How To Repair a Trip Hazard

On the video attached they reference the following products - Ultrabond 2100 and Miracle Bond 1310 -

https://protect-za.mimecast.com/s/I1kECY6YpoCo1j5kh0RgS1?domain=youtube.com

 

I am trying to do a similar repair to a trip hazard and cannot allocate these products - Ultrabond 2100 and Miracle Bond 1310? Does anyone know what suitable replacement products could be used instead?

MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: How To Repair a Trip Hazard

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community @FrankieL. It's fantastic to have you join us and many thanks for your question.

 

If the trip hazard is less than 25mm at the highest point Lanko 5kg 136 Rapid Patching Mortar would be a suitable product to use. If the trip hazard is higher than 25mm you can use a combination of Lanko 5kg 189 Bulk Fill Screed to fill and then taper it into the adjoining slab with the 136. Lanko 189 must be laid at a minimum thickness of 10mm and needs Lanko 1L 124 Surface Primer to ensure a great bond.

 

When applying the Lanko 136 onto the existing concrete or over Lanko 189 you need to ensure the area is clean from contaminants and you'll need to soak the area with water before commencing.

 

With Lanko products and likewise the products in the video if the slab is still in the process of shifting they will crack and separate. You can certainly patch these cracks once the slab has stopped shifting though.

 

Please let me know if you require further advice or had any questions on the process.

 

Mitchell

 

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petkorazzi
New Contributor

Re: How To Repair a Trip Hazard

I want to get rid of a trip hazard from uneven concrete.  Can I just use any sand and cement with a primer?

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: How To Repair a Trip Hazard

Welcome to the Bunnings Workshop community @petkorazzi. It's wonderful to have you join us, and many thanks for your question about fixing a trip hazard.

 

The method I've described above is suitable for a workplace or public space and complies with regulations on rectifying trip hazards. It's also a process that ensures the repair will last for many years. For home, you could use various products and cement with a primer could last for some time. However, cement isn't renowned for its structural integrity in thin or small applications. It crumbles and breaks away quite easily. Lanko 5kg 136 Rapid Patching Mortar is designed for both repairing concrete and constructing ramps. It also achieves exceptionally high strength levels, making it much more suitable for a job like this.

 

If you'd like to upload an image of the trip hazard, I could provide further advice.

 

Please let me know if you have any questions.

 

Mitchell

 

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petkorazzi
New Contributor

Re: How To Repair a Trip Hazard

Thanks for the quick reply.  I originally ordered the Lanko 136.  When it was delivered I didn't think it would be enough.  I exchanged it.  I spoke to my builder friend.  He said to get floor leveller.  I later watched a video but it didn't seem right.  I returned the floor leveller but they ran out of Lanko 136.  I saw Dunlop 5kg Ardit Rapidset Repair Mortar which seemed to be the same stuff so I bought it.  Now I notice there is Dunlop 5kg Floor Repairer Rapid Patch Mortar. Should I get the Lanko 136 or will one of these do?  Which one?  Also, do I need primer.  I bought 5L because it was better value. The total area is 20 square metres but not all of it needs to be levelled. The biggest gap is 3cm height.   I am so confused. 

 

IMG_20210919_081118.jpgIMG_20210919_081107.jpg

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: How To Repair a Trip Hazard

@petkorazzi,

 

These would be considered large pavers, which are more fluid than a fixed stationary slab. There's continuous movement, whether that is from subsidence or tree roots pushing them up. Any repair you do with a solid mortar, grout or cement will crack the next time they move. What really needs to happen is that the pavers get lifted, the issues are addressed, the ground is levelled and compacted, and then they are re-laid.

 

My hesitation in recommending a product is the same reason we don't use cement between pavers. They move, and the cement cracks. If you were to use a mortar or grout and a primer, I'd expect to see the repaired area fail sometime in the future. Using a self-levelling product might work, but it will be prone to the same cracking issues.

 

Let me mention @Adam_W to get his thoughts.

 

Mitchell

 

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