Workshop
Ask a question

The Bunnings Workshop community can help with your home improvement projects.

How to stop neighbour tree roots into my property?

kiranraob4u
Finding My Feet

How to stop neighbour tree roots into my property?

My neighbour has big trees close to the fence 2-5m & roots spreading into my property which is preventing my plants to grow. This is my new house along the fence I planted few fruit trees almost a year now they didn’t grow an inch. When I checked neighbours tree roots engulfed the plants sucking all nutrients. Any suggestions on this matter?

 

regards 

Kiran

EricL
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: neighbour tree roots into my property

Hello @kiranraob4u 

 

Welcome to the Bunnings, Workshop community. It's sensational to have you join us, and thanks for sharing your question about your fruit trees.

 

I suggest moving your fruit trees to another location where their roots can spread out properly. I don't think that the large tree wants to share. Your other option is to build a large-raised garden bed enough to accommodate your fruit trees. If the tree is very mature, I'm afraid cutting the roots will not be effective as it has already established itself. 

 

Let me call on our experienced members @Dave-1, @mich1972 and @Noelle for their recommendations.  

 

If you need further assistance, please let us know.

 

Eric

 

See something interesting? Give it the thumbs up!
Noelle
Kind of a Big Deal

Re: neighbour tree roots into my property

Hi @kiranraob4u 

Moving your fruit trees now, while they are dormant over wunter, is the best option to give them any chance of survival. They cannot compete successfully with established trees with extensive root systems.

 

Lift them carefully, trim their roots of necessary and replant them into prepared panting holes well away from the large trees.

robchin
Becoming a Leader

Re: How to stop neighbour tree roots into my property?

Hi @kiranraob4u 

Not much you can do about your neighbours trees and the suggestions below about moving your trees makes sense to me. 

BUT - this is not going to solve your problem in the longer term. The roots are only going to keep growing and spreading. Without having a lot of additional detail I wanted to suggest that you may want to consider a root barrier along the fence line where the neighbours' trees are. It's a physical barrier that will deter the roots. Root barriers are typically impervious barriers that deter the tree roots from going through it. BUT it does require some work as you need expose the roots and then sever them to put the vertical barrier in. Good longer term option. 

I work for Bunnings and we sell root barriers. Jack 600mm x 5m Recycled Garden Root Barrier - Bunnings Australia

Good luck. 

robchin_0-1718060100252.png

 

Dave-1
Home Improvement Guru

Re: How to stop neighbour tree roots into my property?

Morning @kiranraob4u 

True roots are a pain, They can also come from further then you expect as in across a whole yard. Trees be trees and they want nutrients or water :smile:

I like trees but dont like them wrecking foundations or paths. So it is a quandry about what to do about the roots.

 

When I redid my stormwater pipes I went through a LOT of roots that possibly came from my neighbours, largest root being 40cm ish in width. So I ended up with a long trench that was backfilled with gravel, a water pipe (PVC) and then clay on top. This has slowed the roots id say for now. 

 

I have gum trees in my yard and raised veggie gardens... So the trees steal my nutrients and love my conmpost bin :smile: I figure its ballance between giving the tree some food and looking after my garden. Your fruit trees may not be in a growing spurt as they could have transplant shock/wrong time of the year to grow and also just be young. Id give it some time to see how it goes a little longer. 2-3m is far enough away from the fenceline that the council rules generally cover. What type of trees are your fruit trees ?

 

Dave

Re: How to stop neighbour tree roots into my property?

Hi Dave,

Lime Tahitian tree I planted it a year ago not growing so I decided to remove it and replant it in a wide hole with good soil and manure then I noticed plant is fully surrounded by neighbour palm tree roots. Currently transferred it into a big pot. 

Couple of months ago I planted cool banana variety & there is another neighbour plant close to it 3-4 m (not sure what plant it is) I hope root will not spread to banana plant.

Mandarin plant is approx 5 m away from another neighbour plant (not sure what plant it is).

I want to plant some more fruit plants in this winter so that they can establish but they will very close to neighbour plants. Better to plant them in garden bed  2 m x 1m wide? with builder plastic under or root barrier? 

 

Regards 

Kiran

Re: How to stop neighbour tree roots into my property?

Hi @robchin,

How to dig that thin and long trench (Clay soil) ? 600mm depth will prevent neighbour tree root spreading?

 

Regards 

Kiran

Dave-1
Home Improvement Guru

Re: How to stop neighbour tree roots into my property?

Evening @kiranraob4u 

The distances you are mentioning shouldnt be a problem, Otherwise we would all have to live on acres of land to grow things :smile: I have a couple of coffee trees, maybe a mango (I have forgotten 🐵 two liqid ambers, plus two crepe myrtles, a jacaranda and an old bottle brush all in my front yard. They seem to start slow and then wooshka! Away they go. Oh and a Fig tree that is going like crazy! 

 

I have planted them all with generally a hole three times the size of the original pots they came in. I usually follow the shade/sunlight/sheltered areas the trees have recomended. I have lost an olive tree as I planted it in clay without really digging a big enough hole and we had a period of way to dry weather. 

 

The Bannanas I have heard grow pretty steadily, madarins not necasarily fast. Roots can spread and cross over within a yard (hence my explanation of my yard) My soil is clay with more clay and rocks lol I have use compost and also berms to help with maintaining water/coolness and even used windbreaks to help the plants.  I prefer to let them grow in ground and have companion plants or set areas where I grow a type of plant.

 

Moving a plant that isnt growing and replanting it can work but I would expect it to be slow to pick up speed in growing for awhile. Id suggest give it some more time :smile: Think of your yard as rooms that you grow your plants in. Mandarine room and tahitian tree may be in the same room as they require same type of conditions? (Just taking a guess as ive never looked into a tahitian tree) 

 

Dave

MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: neighbour tree roots into my property

Hi @kiranraob4u,

 

For a long, thin trench, you'd be looking at using a trenching shovel and a mattock.

 

Mitchell

 

See something interesting? Give it the thumbs up!

Why join the Bunnings Workshop community?

Workshop is a friendly place to learn, get ideas and find inspiration for your home improvement projects