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Should we use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall?

far213
Junior Contributor

Should we use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall?

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We like to make a slat wall as a feature wall like the photo I attached. We are not sure if it’s better to use a nailer or just use  3M hanging strips. It sounds like the strips can hold weights higher than the weight of those wooden boards. And i read they damage the wall less and i guess they should be easier for  DiY. I appreciate it if you share your idea and experience with me. Thank you.

StevieB
Projects Editor
Projects Editor

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

Looks like a fantastic project @far213. Which room will you have this feature wall in?

 

Let me tag @MitchellMc and @ProjectPete who may be able to offer suggestions.

 

We'd love to see the completed feature wall and hear about any challenges along the way so please keep us updated with your project.

 

Stevie

 

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far213
Junior Contributor

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

Hello everyone. We plan to do it in our powder room. The room is very long 3m by 1.4m and currently looks not very cohesive.

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

Hi @far213,

 

That's an interesting idea to use 3M hanging strips, and it could potentially be easier than permanently fixing the timber in place, though I am unsure about the longevity. Do you intend for this to be a permanent installation, or is there a chance you might like to remove it in the future? I believe the level of finish you would achieve from a more permanent solution would exceed that of using adhesive strips. This is mainly due to timber very rarely being perfectly straight. With a mechanical fixing like a nail, you can pull the timber into shape and then fix it into place. I feel this might be a case of doing the job once and doing it right.

 

The 3M strips will likely hold the timber initially, though I am almost certain that you'll need to replace strips, and at least some of the timber will pull away from the wall. The other issue you might experience is that the strips are only easily removable if you can access the pull tab on the bottom of the strip. In your case, this pull tab is going to be covered by the timber and is inaccessible. This means that if you decide to remove the timber, you'll need to pull it off the wall, which will damage it.

 

I'd be interested to hear @ProjectPete's thoughts. Perhaps @TedBear might also like to provide theirs as well.

 

Please let me know if you have questions.

 

Mitchell

 

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TedBear
Valued Contributor

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

I agree with @MitchellMc that it is an interesting idea and agree with his reservations. But I've never tried it, so I won't knock it. Since you intend to do it in a potentially humid location, I suggest considering using Command's Blue line of strips, which are designed for bathrooms and better suited to humidity and temperature changes. You may have to use many to ensure that the pull-out effect of timber strips (ie bending outward, as @MitchellMc  stated) is accounted for, as this could extert forces on the strips greater than that of the weight of the timber.

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redracer01
Trusted Contributor

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

Hello @far213 

 

I'm intrigued by your idea but at the same time the diy'er in me is sounding caution. Using 3m command strips might possibly work, but if this is going to be a permanent or long term decoration on your wall I suggest going for a strong adhesive and mechanical aid. For example using Liquid Nails will assure you that the slat will not fall, twist or bend in case you happen to exert a light force on it such as leaning or when being brushed up with your shoulder. The mechanical aid such as nails or screws will hold the slat in place while the glue dries. In the event of changing minds or decorations, removing the slats will damage the walls and you will have to sand, clean and repaint. Putting slats on the wall is a wonderful idea it creates a feature on your wall and breaks up the monotony of a blank wall. It also will not cost you an arm and leg to do this. The finish on the slats also acts as a natural mood setter in the room. Darker tints will give it a serious formal look where lighter tints will give it that nice beach house vibe. There are a few methods of doing the slat decorations but putting it on straight to the wall is about as straightforward as it gets. How ever you decide please keep us informed so that other members will benefit from your experience.

 

Cheers,

Red


I am a Bunnings team member. Any opinions or recommendations shared here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of Bunnings.
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far213
Junior Contributor

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

Thank you so much for your replies. I wonder if it’s good enough to nail the slats to the plasterboards or should be nailed to the timber behind the plasterboards. And if the later wouldn’t putting like 20 nails to the timber break its     Strength?

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MitchellMc
Bunnings Team Member
Bunnings Team Member

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

Hi @far213,

 

A method for applying the timber beading would be to run a line of Selleys 320g Liquid Nails Original Construction Adhesive along the length of timber and then stick it to the wall. A bradder nail gun would then be used to fix it in place mechanically. When using the glue, you'll likely only need four brad nails per piece, top and bottom and a couple in between. They are really just there to hold it in position until the glue dries. It is important to get this first piece perfectly straight even if the adjoining wall is out of square, as it will govern the rest of the install. If it is not, when you reach the far wall, the beading will be drastically out of perpendicular to the floor. After installing the first piece, you'll need a spacer to get the next piece correctly positioned. You could do this by hand, but glue and nails are required for a permanent solution.

 

Mitchell

 

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TedBear
Valued Contributor

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

You definitely need to nail into timber. Nails only hold in by stretching the timber fibres around the edges as they pass through. Those stretched fibres close in & grip the nail shaft. In plaster it will just punch through and the nail will fall back out the hole. (Nailed plasterboard is held in place by the wide, flat head of the nails designed for that job.)  You won't need many nails, just enough to prevent the timber bending along its length. 3 or 4 should do it, with adhesive to assist in keeping it straight & in place. If you are going to nail them, drill the timber slats first (hole size a tad smaller than the timber* nail size) so the nails don't split them.

(* don't use plasterboard nails.)

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far213
Junior Contributor

Re: use nailer or 3M hanging strips to make a slatwall

Thank you so much for your response. We decided to go ahead with this project. Can you please share with me the nail gun we need to use (we plan to hire it from bunnings) and the glue you recommend to use? Thank you. 

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